Paul Mackie

Paul.Mackie@MobilityLab.orgPaul Mackie smaller

Paul has been Communications Director at Mobility Lab since 2012. He specializes in reporting, writing, editing, helping journalists, and speaking about how places can become vibrant through public-transportation initiatives.

For the eight years prior to joining Mobility Lab, he was Climate Change Communications Director at The Nature Conservancy and Director of Media Relations at the World Resources Institute.

He has also been a daily newspaper journalist at various outlets in the St. Louis area; a freelancer for the Chicago Tribune, National Geographic, and other media organizations; and a writer at the National Association of Counties. Paul has been quoted on transportation issues by USA Today, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Washington Post, NPR, and many others; has spoken at many conferences, including MIT’s Disrupting Mobility, Innovate Raleigh, and various state and national transportation events; and received the 2015 Excellence in Advocacy Award and 2013 Presidents Award from the Association of Commuter Transportation.

paul-speaking-at-techiesPaul is currently serving on the “Safe Routes to Healthy Foods Taskforce” of the Safe Routes to School National Partnership and on a panel that provides direction and guidance for disseminating research produced by the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP), a collaboration of the Federal Transit Administration (FTA); the Academies and its Transportation Research Board (TRB); and the Transit Development Corporation, an educational and research arm of the American Public Transit Association (APTA). He is also a member of the Surface Transportation Communicators of DC.

Paul obtained his master’s degree in media studies and political science from Georgetown University and his bachelor’s in English literature and journalism from Southern Illinois University. On a personal level, he enjoys writing at his blog Pop Culture Lunch Box, tennis and other sports, playing and listening to music, and traveling with his wife Rachel, son Jackson, and daughter Zoey.

His first car was a Chevy Chevette. Now he bikes through three states to get to work. And his bike is a lot nicer than the Chevette.

Driver speed, texting is the new drunk driving

Streetsblog’s Angie Schmitt brings to light a really important issue that we think about every day at Mobility Lab. She notes that Americans spend more time on average every day driving their cars than socializing with other people. And this is likely skewing the ways people think about and care about other people as they… Read more »

Vox/Mobility Lab video: The high cost of free parking

When Steve Jobs pitched Apple’s new California campus – which opened earlier this year – he wanted to turn parking lots into green landscapes. But the city of Cupertino demanded 11,000 parking spots, which put a wrench in that part of Jobs’ vision. Cupertino’s parking requirements are not unique. It’s estimated that, in America, there… Read more »

Mobility Lab Express #114

Read Mobility Lab Express #114 We’ve got a lot of great stuff happening here in the dog days of summer at Mobility Lab. If you like the Express newsletter, you’ll LOVE our relatively new Mobility Lab Daily, with all the TDM news you need to know from around the web. And if you haven’t been… Read more »

Oregon law meddles and could hurt local bike sales

It seems that Oregon policymakers want to encourage people to buy bicycles at Amazon.com rather than local bike shops. The state has proposed a flat $15 tax on any new adult bikes purchased for $200 or more. This is a bit odd because, while the funding is earmarked for the Connect Oregon program to make… Read more »

Aspen will examine traffic issues with a “mobility lab”

As transportation-policy rockstar Ray LaHood once said at a Mobility Lab event, there should be Mobility Labs all over the U.S. While our little shop headquartered in Arlington, Va., may still be the only Mobility Lab in the country, there may soon be another. With Aspen, Colo., “drowning in automobiles,” Mayor Steve Skadron is hoping to… Read more »

Ease of transportation access gets a look in Hawaii and Pennsylvania

[Editor: An interesting update to the Hawaii story (June 30, 2017): Companies that work in transportation could advise the transportation management association and help create policies to ease traffic on Waikiki’s streets. Makes sense, and is similar to recommendations recently in a George Mason study on how Arlington, Va., could work more closely with delivery companies… Read more »

California merchants, public clamor for rethinking our transportation impulses

In bustling city cores, people driving alone in their personal cars can be the worst thing for local merchants. Many of them simply didn’t know it before, but they’re slowly beginning to figure it out. Three new stories out of California show that the state is taking the concept of transportation demand seriously. Take this example:… Read more »

Post-Travis Kalanick, Uber needs to finally think deeply about its role in the world

With today’s news that Travis Kalanick has stepped down as chief executive of Uber, the ride-hailing giant has reached a crossroads on whether it will sink or swim. Its many months of trials and tribulations may be too much to overcome, and the boorish company culture that has come to light again and again will… Read more »

Dallas area is pinpointing ways to make transportation easier and better – Dallas News

It’s encouraging to see that, even in car-centric suburbs, more and more people are starting to open their eyes to the possibilities of more and better transportation options. Take Plano, Texas, for example, right outside of Dallas, where a new study finds that 41 percent of the population is interested in options other than traveling… Read more »

Stanford’s drive-alone rate has dropped 22 percentage points since 2000 – Stanford News

Stanford is a leader on transportation demand management, and the university has a robust “No Net New Commute Trips” goal to back it. That goal seeks to accomplish “no additional automobile trips during the peak commute time in the campus commute direction in the morning and evening.” On top of the goal, Stanford has posted… Read more »

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