Paul Mackie

Paul.Mackie@MobilityLab.orgPaul Mackie smaller

Paul has been Communications Director at Mobility Lab since 2012. He specializes in reporting, writing, editing, helping journalists, and speaking about how places can become vibrant through public-transportation initiatives.

For the eight years prior to joining Mobility Lab, he was Climate Change Communications Director at The Nature Conservancy and Director of Media Relations at the World Resources Institute.

He has also been a daily newspaper journalist at various outlets in the St. Louis area; a freelancer for the Chicago Tribune, National Geographic, and other media organizations; and a writer at the National Association of Counties. Paul has been quoted on transportation issues by USA Today, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Washington Post, NPR, and many others; has spoken at many conferences, including MIT’s Disrupting Mobility, Innovate Raleigh, and various state and national transportation events; and received the 2015 Excellence in Advocacy Award and 2013 Presidents Award from the Association of Commuter Transportation.

paul-speaking-at-techiesPaul is currently serving on the “Safe Routes to Healthy Foods Taskforce” of the Safe Routes to School National Partnership and on a panel that provides direction and guidance for disseminating research produced by the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP), a collaboration of the Federal Transit Administration (FTA); the Academies and its Transportation Research Board (TRB); and the Transit Development Corporation, an educational and research arm of the American Public Transit Association (APTA). He is also a member of the Surface Transportation Communicators of DC.

Paul obtained his master’s degree in media studies and political science from Georgetown University and his bachelor’s in English literature and journalism from Southern Illinois University. On a personal level, he enjoys writing at his blog Pop Culture Lunch Box, tennis and other sports, playing and listening to music, and traveling with his wife Rachel, son Jackson, and daughter Zoey.

His first car was a Chevy Chevette. Now he bikes through three states to get to work. And his bike is a lot nicer than the Chevette.

New report highlights most dangerous cities for walking, calls for pedestrian-centered streets

Ever since the car began dominating the way people move throughout the United States, bicycling and walking have become often dangerous and shunted propositions. Decades later, more engineers, planners, and developers are understanding the importance of rethinking the car-centered designs of roads in order to mitigate the dangers they pose for pedestrians. Today, Smart Growth… Read more »

Media should be more balanced in articles about new transportation options

Several articles today across the mainstream media are pinpointing negative aspects about the latest major transportation projects and sidestepping all the positives these improvements will bring to communities. In The New York Times, Emma Fitzsimmons explores the fear of rents soaring with the opening of three new subway stops on the Upper East Side. While this… Read more »

New carpooling service looks to employers for ride-matching potential

Commuter carpooling has been in a nosedive since about 1980. And it’s nearly inexplicable that the rate hovers around 5 percent in Washington, D.C., where traffic and parking are particularly abominable even though there are many – maybe too many – ride sharing resources . Since 1980, leaders have invested in HOV lanes and E-ZPass,… Read more »

12 ways developers can guide tenants to better transportation decisions

Real-estate developers and property managers have long been coming around to the simple business decision that, if they want to manage profitable projects and attract tenants, they should build and own near transit and other non-driving options. Just look at Detroit: A 2.5-mile streetcar system expected to launch in a few months to downtown is… Read more »

Ride-hailing has a friend in Chao, but does self-driving?

In today’s USA Today, technology and culture reporter Marco della Cava notes that although incoming U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao’s “public service record is extensive, her leadership tenure as Labor secretary and at the head of organizations such as the United Way and the Peace Corps doesn’t shed much light on how she would rule… Read more »

Trump’s new DOT secretary should follow inspiring path of LaHood, Foxx

Donald Trump has nominated Elaine Chao for Secretary of Transportation, reports Politico. Chao, the daughter of a shipping magnate and wife of Senate Majority Leader Mitche McConnell, served as Secretary of Labor under George W. Bush. Mobility Lab hopes the U.S. DOT continues down the impressive road it has followed of the past two secretaries,… Read more »

Wake County Transit Plan speeds toward Durham

The news: Wake County—which includes Raleigh— has passed a measure that allows a half cent increase in the local sales tax to help fund expanded bus service, create dedicated bus lanes, and eventually help finance a proposed 37-mile long commuter rail system. Despite doubt about how much the Triangle’s college community will use the new public… Read more »

Day of Remembrance for Victims of Traffic Violence is a chance to reflect on nation’s street safety trends

For a country that appears to be growing more fearful, we seem to be letting our guard down on what may be the most unsafe activity of all: jumping into our personal vehicles every day. Which is why this Sunday, November 20, is so important. It’s the little-known World Day of Remembrance for Victims of… Read more »

Record number of transit ballot measures will also impact transportation demand management

Election Day this upcoming Tuesday will be a crucial one for the future of public transportation in this country. This election sets records for the most transit measures ever in a single year (77), the highest number of states with measures on either state or local ballots (25), and the most money at stake on… Read more »

Five Smart City Challenge ideas that cities should make happen

This summer, Columbus won the U.S. Department of Transportation’s $50 million Smart City Challenge, and there’s no denying that the Ohio city is just one of many in the U.S. in need of a shift to solve its transportation woes. Indeed, Columbus is the largest U.S. city without commuter rail, lacks zoning that could make… Read more »

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