Paul Mackie

Paul.Mackie@MobilityLab.orgPaul Mackie smaller

Paul is Communications Director at Mobility Lab. For the eight years prior to joining Mobility Lab, he was Climate Change Communications Director at The Nature Conservancy and Director of Media Relations at the World Resources Institute, where he worked on better transportation options as part of the Institute’s EMBARQ work.

He has also been a daily newspaper journalist at various outlets in the St. Louis area; a freelancer for the Chicago Tribune, National Geographic, and other media organizations; and a writer at the National Association of Counties. Paul has been quoted on transportation issues by USA Today, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Washington Post, NPR, and many others. He obtained his master’s degree in media studies and political science from Georgetown University and his bachelor’s in English literature and journalism from Southern Illinois University.

Paul enjoys writing at his personal blog Pop Culture Lunch Box, tennis and other sports, playing and listening to music, and traveling with his wife Rachel, son Jackson, and daughter Zoey. His first car was a Chevy Chevette. Now he bikes 8.5 miles to work. And his bike is a lot nicer than the Chevette.

Different needs throughout U.S. complicate Congressional transportation policy

City, suburb, and rural differences present policy dilemmas No matter how divided politicians are across the U.S., Republicans and Democrats can still agree that sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic is something worth fixing. That said, the recently passed, five-year FAST Act transportation bill does represent a slight increase in funding, but has been largely criticized by… Read more »

Growing TransitScreen hopes to bring real-time info to 40 cities in 2016

Walking down the street in the near future, you may encounter a massive projection on the sidewalk. Or wall-mounted displays in office lobbies. What you’re seeing is the transportation network coming to life. “As urban mobility gets more complex, the problem of how to get informed is only getting more severe,” said Matt Caywood, CEO… Read more »

How will autonomous vehicles affect our day-to-day lives?

AASHTO, AMPO, ACT, APA, APTA, CTAA, EPA, NACo, NADO, NARC, T4A.* These are all acronyms for organizations, not to mention Mobility Lab, that are shooting for much of the same thing: to improve the quality of our lives and of our transportation options. However, we can’t help but notice that, despite our many common goals,… Read more »

Transportation redefined: Cities must work with shared mobility options

It’s no secret: transit agencies have been slow to adapt to the rapid changes in the ways people are moving around in cities. Think Uber. Fights between public agencies and newer companies have dominated headlines, compared to the trickle of news about partnerships that should be forming – all set to the backdrop of age-old… Read more »

Federal agencies highlight the intersection of housing and transportation

People often consider the costs of owning or renting a home and getting to and from it as completely separate items in their budgets. They also likely consider these items as highly personal and local matters beyond the influence of the federal government. But U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx and Housing Secretary Julian Castro made the… Read more »

Mental health suffers when we surrender to car culture

Maria Hernandez, from Montgomery County, Maryland, was always afraid she wouldn’t know how to use public transportation. But since deciding to learn, she rejoices in being “able to relax, read a book, and enjoy the scenery – which you really can’t do when you’re driving.” No doubt Hernandez is onto something that has been very… Read more »

Where are the Super Bowl-esque ads about public transportation?

When it comes to communicating that people have transportation options besides their own drive-alone cars, the transit industry is getting its lunch handed to it, and has been for decades. It must face that it’s a fringe player that wants to become mainstream. And it’s not getting any easier. While we hear so many great stories about options… Read more »

In the current transportation landscape, do you still need to own a car?

Veronica O. Davis gave up her car about three years ago. A big reason for that was the growing availability of Capital Bikeshare in all the places she needed to get to in and around Washington, D.C. Of course, not everyone in D.C., or the rest of the United States, has access to bikeshare, but… Read more »

Want to start carpooling? Pick up your phone and get going

Nearly half of all car trips in the U.S. can technically be defined as carpooling. But that’s because we often travel together with our friends and family. Besides those joy rides, sharing a car has had a troubling recent history – mainly when it comes to the ways we get to and from work. Carpooling… Read more »

Five ways TDM is invisible (and why that should change)

Transportation demand management is like an alarm clock. It’s the under-appreciated mechanism that, once set into place, plays a significant role in changing your routine and habits over time. The alarm clock does the dirty – largely invisible – work of taking you from a restless, grumpy night of sleep into the sun-shining, coffee-scented, iPad-reading… Read more »

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