Paul Mackie

Paul.Mackie@MobilityLab.orgPaul Mackie smaller

Paul has been Communications Director at Mobility Lab since 2012. He specializes in reporting, writing, editing, helping journalists, and speaking about how places can become vibrant through public-transportation initiatives.

For the eight years prior to joining Mobility Lab, he was Climate Change Communications Director at The Nature Conservancy and Director of Media Relations at the World Resources Institute.

He has also been a daily newspaper journalist at various outlets in the St. Louis area; a freelancer for the Chicago Tribune, National Geographic, and other media organizations; and a writer at the National Association of Counties. Paul has been quoted on transportation issues by USA Today, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Washington Post, NPR, and many others; has spoken at many conferences, including MIT’s Disrupting Mobility, Innovate Raleigh, and various state and national transportation events; and received the 2015 Excellence in Advocacy Award and 2013 Presidents Award from the Association of Commuter Transportation.

Paul is currently serving on the “Safe Routes to Healthy Foods Taskforce” of the Safe Routes to School National Partnership and on a panel that provides direction and guidance for disseminating research produced by the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP), a collaboration of the Federal Transit Administration (FTA); the Academies and its Transportation Research Board (TRB); and the Transit Development Corporation, an educational and research arm of the American Public Transit Association (APTA). He is also a member of the Surface Transportation Communicators of DC.

Paul obtained his master’s degree in media studies and political science from Georgetown University and his bachelor’s in English literature and journalism from Southern Illinois University. On a personal level, he enjoys writing at his blog Pop Culture Lunch Box, tennis and other sports, playing and listening to music, and traveling with his wife Rachel, son Jackson, and daughter Zoey.

His first car was a Chevy Chevette. Now he bikes through three states to get to work. And his bike is a lot nicer than the Chevette.

Improving safe routes to school through champions for open data

The following post is based on a presentation to a Safe Routes to School National Partnership webinar, “Harnessing the Power of Data to Support Kids Walking and Biking.” The accompanying slides and the webinar recording can be found here. In the United States, cities build all kinds of new infrastructure when it’s time to host… Read more »

Three weeks in, Portland’s Biketown bikeshare proving popular and easy to use

The brand-new Biketown system in Portland, Ore., is already taking off, and a tour of its offerings shows a unique system that improves the transportation options of locals and visitors alike. It’s great for transportation geeks because it automatically provides detailed data about one’s rides. It’s great for those who want to sightsee because stations are… Read more »

Even in Silicon Valley, people need to be educated about transportation options

The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority in northern California is considering cutting all bus service in Palo Alto other than two lines that connect to San Jose. But instead of focusing on its stated goal of increasing ridership and revenue, the VTA would be wise to invest in transportation demand management, including tweaking its bus… Read more »

REI knows that free Capital Bikeshare rides is sound business strategy

For business owners, embracing bicycle and pedestrian traffic – not to mention transit access – should be a better business strategy than getting car traffic to their locations. Realty companies understand this, and they should know better than most. But REI, the outdoor-adventure store, is taking this fact to the highest level: it is offering… Read more »

Analysis of military base travel choices leads to improved pedestrian connections, more transportation options

Arlington’s work to improve military base transportation options gets top marks Look at a map of Arlington County, Virginia, and it’s easy to see just how much of it is covered by Arlington National Cemetery and the crescent moon-shaped Fort Myer-Henderson Hall military base on its western border. But, considering Arlington’s wide array of public… Read more »

Better data collection and accessibility would help advocates get kids walking and biking to school again

How do we get back to a simpler time, when kids physically exerted themselves on the way to school by bicycling or walking, and in the process made themselves healthier, more attentive in class, and happier? Believe it or not, one answer may be with technology. Through accessible and usable data, advocates can use fact-based priorities… Read more »

Virginians are diversifying travel habits, want more transportation options, state survey says

Commute survey also shows telework increasing, with potential for more Virginia is seeing several trends that offer encouragement to areas racked with congestion, according to the recently released 2015 Virginia Statewide Travel Study. “Overall, between 2007 and 2015, use of transit increased by 33 percent, even though people didn’t perceive that there was an increase in transit… Read more »

Forget the Motor (City), sightsee Detroit by bicycle

When I arrived at Wheelhouse Detroit to rent a bicycle, I explained to the people there that I like to tour any new city I visit by bike. Ironically, I was in town for the TU-Detroit auto-technology show, but bikes are by far the best way to quickly and enjoyably get a sense of the… Read more »

Columbus could set tone for the transportation system of the “smart city”

It’s been a very good week for the state of Ohio. First, the Cleveland Cavaliers win their first-ever NBA title. Now Columbus is named the $50 million winner of the U.S. DOT’s Smart City Challenge. This is an exciting development for a couple of reasons. First, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx has uncovered a very visible way that… Read more »

Two keys to how autonomous vehicles could ease congestion

Autonomous vehicles could soon lead us down the road so efficiently that they reduce traffic gridlock and air pollution while saving lives and money on infrastructure projects. On the other hand, people could be attracted to riding in self-driving cars more often, making our highways even more crowded. Autonomous vehicles could also generate more trips… Read more »

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