Paul Mackie

Paul.Mackie@MobilityLab.orgPaul Mackie smaller

Paul has been Communications Director at Mobility Lab since 2012. He specializes in reporting, writing, editing, helping journalists, and giving presentations about how places can become vibrant through public-transportation initiatives.

For the eight years prior to joining Mobility Lab, he was Climate Change Communications Director at The Nature Conservancy and Director of Media Relations at the World Resources Institute, where he worked on better transportation options as part of the Institute’s EMBARQ work.

He has also been a daily newspaper journalist at various outlets in the St. Louis area; a freelancer for the Chicago Tribune, National Geographic, and other media organizations; and a writer at the National Association of Counties. Paul has been quoted on transportation issues by USA Today, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Washington Post, NPR, and many others. He obtained his master’s degree in media studies and political science from Georgetown University and his bachelor’s in English literature and journalism from Southern Illinois University.

Paul enjoys writing at his personal blog Pop Culture Lunch Box, tennis and other sports, playing and listening to music, and traveling with his wife Rachel, son Jackson, and daughter Zoey. His first car was a Chevy Chevette. Now he bikes 8.5 miles to work. And his bike is a lot nicer than the Chevette.

Forget the Motor (City), sightsee Detroit by bicycle

When I arrived at Wheelhouse Detroit to rent a bicycle, I explained to the people there that I like to tour any new city I visit by bike. Ironically, I was in town for the TU-Detroit auto-technology show, but bikes are by far the best way to quickly and enjoyably get a sense of the… Read more »

Columbus could set tone for the transportation system of the “smart city”

It’s been a very good week for the state of Ohio. First, the Cleveland Cavaliers win their first-ever NBA title. Now Columbus is named the $50 million winner of the U.S. DOT’s Smart City Challenge. This is an exciting development for a couple of reasons. First, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx has uncovered a very visible way that… Read more »

Two keys to how autonomous vehicles could ease congestion

Autonomous vehicles could soon lead us down the road so efficiently that they reduce traffic gridlock and air pollution while saving lives and money on infrastructure projects. On the other hand, people could be attracted to riding in self-driving cars more often, making our highways even more crowded. Autonomous vehicles could also generate more trips… Read more »

The little yellow bicycle button that gets the attention of city leaders

Swedish company Hövding – best known for its bicycle airbag-helmet, which was explosively modeled at a Transportation Techies meetup in 2015 – is back in the news with the release of another bike product that puts a modern spin on a classic function. The yellow handlebar buttons, called “Flic” buttons,  combine the best of so… Read more »

Transit industry could look to an unlikely source for marketing inspiration: automakers

Automakers have always been one of the envies of the marketing world. They sold us on cars over horses. They sold us on how we should think bicycling and walking are abnormal compared to driving. Mobility Lab is a media sponsor at the 16th Annual TU-Automotive Detroit conference in Novi, Mich., which bills itself as the oldest existing yearly… Read more »

Transportation planners need to use tech to catch up to public demand

Technology – from broad improvements like GPS to the autonomous cars still on the horizon – is swallowing many of the advances our engineers and planners have made since the invention of the Model T. It’s scary, and perhaps a little disheartening, for cities and their transportation agencies. But it also presents a do-or-die opportunity for… Read more »

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation cuts solo driving with employee programs

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is renowned for helping people lead healthy, productive lives. And at its headquarters in Seattle, the foundation encourages its employees to adopt healthy transportation and commuting habits. All full-time commuters at the foundation benefit from an internal transportation program. Established in 2011 by Bree Moore, the foundation’s transportation and life… Read more »

After first test, the Hyperloop still has to convince public it’s a worthy option

When Mobility Lab and other experts discuss improving transportation connections for people, we often mean within their local areas. A recent test of the Hyperloop, however, suggests we should allocate a bit more time considering how to better connect the entire country. Think about it, the recent travails of the Metro subway in Washington, D.C.,… Read more »

Is “on-demand” the missing ingredient in carpooling?

New app RideFlag seeks to make carpooling instantaneous The jury is still out on how much traffic is being alleviated by ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft. But we’ve known for decades how much carpooling and vanpooling programs cut down on road congestion. About 11 percent of U.S. commuters pool on their way to work,… Read more »

What does the new transportation landscape mean for public-private partnerships?

It’s safe to say that public-private partnerships, also known as P3s, have had a rocky history in the United States, with some major infrastructure projects costing cities more than anticipated or leaving them with questions over complex contracts. But as officials are now confronted with the rapidly expanding ways people are moving throughout their cities… Read more »

Share this item

5 Comments or Mentions

0 Comment(s)

Mentions

This article has been mentioned in 5 other place(s).

Leave a Comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *