Mobility Lab https://mobilitylab.org Moving People... Instead of Just Cars Thu, 20 Jul 2017 16:04:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Vox/Mobility Lab video: The high cost of free parking https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/19/voxmobility-lab-video-high-cost-free-parking/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/19/voxmobility-lab-video-high-cost-free-parking/#respond Wed, 19 Jul 2017 13:00:13 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23276 When Steve Jobs pitched Apple’s new California campus – which opened earlier this year – he wanted to turn parking lots into green landscapes. But the city of Cupertino demanded 11,000 parking spots, which put a wrench in that part of Jobs’ vision. Cupertino’s parking requirements are not unique. It’s estimated that, in America, there... Read more »

The post Vox/Mobility Lab video: The high cost of free parking appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>

When Steve Jobs pitched Apple’s new California campus – which opened earlier this year – he wanted to turn parking lots into green landscapes. But the city of Cupertino demanded 11,000 parking spots, which put a wrench in that part of Jobs’ vision.

Cupertino’s parking requirements are not unique. It’s estimated that, in America, there are eight parking spots for every car, covering up to 30 percent of our cities, and collectively taking up about as much space as the state of West Virginia.

The more parking we have, the more encouraged we are to drive and to shape our urban landscapes based on that parking.

This story and stats are part of a new video on the price of parking and how we have historically done it all wrong in this country. It’s produced by Mobility Lab, the Chilton Media Group, and Vox, released today as part of Vox’s entertaining and educational video series.

In old photos of curbside parking spaces at the dawn of the automobile era, one can see that they were always packed full, and pricing parking wasn’t even an issue yet because parking meters weren’t invented until 1935.

UCLA’s Donald Shoup

UCLA professor and parking guru Donald Shoup is interviewed in the film, detailing the two big parking inventions that came to dominate how we think about and manage parking.

One was the afore-mentioned parking meter, which manufacturers gave away to cities until the meter revenue could be used to pay back the companies. The other was off-street parking requirements that cities began issuing around the same time. Most parking lots today exist because of these so-called “mandatory parking minimums.” Cities began using these requirements to guide development.

Bottom line, says Shoup: “We require our cities to be built with a lot of parking. Off-street parking requirements really spread throughout the United States faster than almost any other urban-planning invention. They arose partly because of the lack of management of on-street parking.”

There are parking requirements for almost all kinds of development, for hospitals (per basinet), golf courses (per holes), swimming pools (per gallons of water), and, even for much-harder-to-figure places like funeral homes (per what?).

Many of the cities we love, like Paris and New York and Amsterdam, don’t have parking requirements. And they wouldn’t look anything like they do now if they did have them.

Other places should take note. Many of the under-used existing parking could be repurposed to much better uses. Shoup makes three recommendations:

  1. Remove off-street parking requirements
  2. Charge the right price for on-street parking, and
  3. To make that pricing politically popular, spend the revenue on public services along the metered streets.

 

Other Mobility Lab parking resources:

The post Vox/Mobility Lab video: The high cost of free parking appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/19/voxmobility-lab-video-high-cost-free-parking/feed/ 0
Biking and shared rides absorb Metro Safetrack spillover – Deloitte https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/19/biking-and-shared-rides-absorb-metro-safetrack-spillover-deloitte/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/19/biking-and-shared-rides-absorb-metro-safetrack-spillover-deloitte/#respond Wed, 19 Jul 2017 12:55:17 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23343 Metro’s usual 700,000 riders per weekday dropped 11 percent this year due partly to Safetrack disruptions. Now Deloitte has dug into the numbers and it’s encouraging to find that not everyone who left D.C.’s Metro during its year-long subways fix-it project replaced those trips by driving alone more. A recent report by Deloitte’s Center for Government Insights... Read more »

The post Biking and shared rides absorb Metro Safetrack spillover – Deloitte appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
Metro’s usual 700,000 riders per weekday dropped 11 percent this year due partly to Safetrack disruptions. Now Deloitte has dug into the numbers and it’s encouraging to find that not everyone who left D.C.’s Metro during its year-long subways fix-it project replaced those trips by driving alone more.

A recent report by Deloitte’s Center for Government Insights finds that the region could support many more bike commuters, carpoolers, and car sharers — given proper encouragement. In fact, D.C. could have up to 155,000 new ridesharing members (Editor: which includes Zipcar and Car2Go, but we’re not sure whether Deloitte has also calculated Uber and Lyft into these numbers or just the UberPool and Lyft Line true-carpooling portions of those services), 428,000 new carpoolers, and a whopping 590,000 new bike commuters, if residents fully embrace these modes of travel.

Arlington County’s Commuter Services office took innovative steps to fill the gap in Metro service with shared taxis and carpools. Arlington officials fast-tracked approval for a shared taxi service from the Ballston metro station to the District, with positive reports. Arlington officials also tried to create a new carpool ‘slug line,’ where commuters pick up other commuters. Arlington tried working with the grass roots slugging community, but the new slug line didn’t quite take off, according to Larry Filler, former bureau chief of Arlington County Commuter Services.

As for biking, more D.C. residents commuted this way to avoid Metro during Safetrack surges. Not surprising since bike commuting in America is growing by about 7.5 percent annually. It’s a smart option too — a recent Michigan Institute of Technology (MIT) analysis of several large cities, including D.C., indicates that biking would be the fastest way to reach large portions of the city during rush hour. Arlington County’s bike trail counter analysis shows a strong peak tied to Metro Safetrack surges last summer.

Unfortunately, these alternates will be temporary for most Metro commuters. Permanently switching these D.C. ridesharers or bike commuters requires both ongoing investment into biking infrastructure and truly regional ridesharing platforms to compete with Uber and Lyft. The ever-innovative Arlington County recently launched its Car Free Near Me app, which is a great start, but would benefit from being scaled up to the entire D.C. metro area [Editor: it does work for the entire metro area], and from the inclusion of various ride-matching and pooled ride options. Local startup Sameride recently launched its carpooling app for the route between Woodbridge and Tysons Corner, and initial reports are positive.

Photo by Elvert Barnes/Flickr.

Read the complete article at Deloitte US

The post Biking and shared rides absorb Metro Safetrack spillover – Deloitte appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/19/biking-and-shared-rides-absorb-metro-safetrack-spillover-deloitte/feed/ 0
New podcast aims to change the conversation about public transit – NextCity https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/18/new-podcast-aims-to-change-the-conversation-about-public-transit-nextcity/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/18/new-podcast-aims-to-change-the-conversation-about-public-transit-nextcity/#respond Tue, 18 Jul 2017 22:16:59 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23338 An intriguing podcast idea has been underway for a bit in the Twin Cities. Here to There, by local public affairs agency Apparatus along with Transit for Livable Communities and St. Paul Smart Trips, is a 10-episode series that looks at different ways people are affected by transportation. Co-host Laura Monn Ginsburg says the show is driven... Read more »

The post New podcast aims to change the conversation about public transit – NextCity appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
An intriguing podcast idea has been underway for a bit in the Twin Cities. Here to There, by local public affairs agency Apparatus along with Transit for Livable Communities and St. Paul Smart Trips, is a 10-episode series that looks at different ways people are affected by transportation.

Co-host Laura Monn Ginsburg says the show is driven by a simple reality. “I have to get from here to there every day. How do I do it, what are my choices, do I even really feel like I have a choice?” she asks. “If we’re talking about a topic as broad as health, as broad as equity, as broad as accessibility, how do we remember that there are individuals living these things out day to day?”

In the first half of each episode, she and co-host Leili Fatehi join a Twin Cities resident for an actual trip, and then talk to an expert or advocate for a broader perspective. For a show on transit and employment, they ride along with a Lyft driver and popular local DJ who talks about the uncertainty of making rent in the gig economy. In the second half, they speak to a transit union president about how, perhaps paradoxically, this rise of transportation gig work is coinciding with a labor shortage for more traditional transit jobs like bus drivers, despite their relatively good pay and dependable schedules.

In another — Ginsburg’s favorite episode so far, she admits — she interviews her own dad, a super commuter who has been crossing the entire Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area daily for 10 years. It’s not a perfect arrangement, he says, but he’s found ways to make the experience comfortable: exiting the highway when possible to drive through neighborhoods he describes as “relaxing” and “familiar.” And yet, though there’s no convenient transit option that would take him to work, he expresses support for public transportation.

Read the complete article at nextcity.org

The post New podcast aims to change the conversation about public transit – NextCity appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/18/new-podcast-aims-to-change-the-conversation-about-public-transit-nextcity/feed/ 0
Mobility Lab Express #114 https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/18/mobility-lab-express-113-2/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/18/mobility-lab-express-113-2/#respond Tue, 18 Jul 2017 14:43:49 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23270 Read Mobility Lab Express #114 We’ve got a lot of great stuff happening here in the dog days of summer at Mobility Lab. If you like the Express newsletter, you’ll LOVE our relatively new Mobility Lab Daily, with all the TDM news you need to know from around the web. And if you haven’t been... Read more »

The post Mobility Lab Express #114 appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
Read Mobility Lab Express #114

We’ve got a lot of great stuff happening here in the dog days of summer at Mobility Lab. If you like the Express newsletter, you’ll LOVE our relatively new Mobility Lab Daily, with all the TDM news you need to know from around the web. And if you haven’t been to our website in a while, take a look: we have an exciting new homepage design at a new Get Involved page.

In this edition: A debate on how transit agencies should or could be advertising their product, how to place bikeshare stations properly, how people are shopping more at Tysons Corner because of good transit information screens, and much more, including Macy’s Washington D.C.’s WMATA, the Association for Commuter Transportation, and what new list is Portland topping?

The post Mobility Lab Express #114 appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/18/mobility-lab-express-113-2/feed/ 0
Seattle companies note job growth requires great transit https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/17/seattle-companies-note-job-growth-requires-great-transit/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/17/seattle-companies-note-job-growth-requires-great-transit/#respond Mon, 17 Jul 2017 22:43:48 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23347 Promoting transit is not just a one-off event for Seattle’s major employers; it’s a core benefit to their employees. In fact, 65 percent of transit boardings in King County are made by someone with an employer-subsidized fare card, signaling just how pervasive this benefit has become. Employers are also investing in on-site amenities for commuters... Read more »

The post Seattle companies note job growth requires great transit appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>

Promoting transit is not just a one-off event for Seattle’s major employers; it’s a core benefit to their employees. In fact, 65 percent of transit boardings in King County are made by someone with an employer-subsidized fare card, signaling just how pervasive this benefit has become. Employers are also investing in on-site amenities for commuters and are even pitching in to help pass local transit initiatives. All told, downtown Seattle employers spent over $100 million in 2016 in support of transit benefits and infrastructure.

Photo of Seattle Center Monorail by Nicola/Flickr.

Read the complete article at seattletransitblog.com

The post Seattle companies note job growth requires great transit appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/17/seattle-companies-note-job-growth-requires-great-transit/feed/ 0
Survey: Transit information displays help businesses, shoppers at Tysons Corner mall – Redmon Group https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/survey-transit-information-displays-help-businesses-shoppers-at-tysons-corner-mall/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/survey-transit-information-displays-help-businesses-shoppers-at-tysons-corner-mall/#respond Fri, 14 Jul 2017 19:37:57 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23260 Sixty-three percent of respondents reported that information they viewed on the six transit-information displays influenced their decision of when to depart the Tysons Corner Center mall in Northern Virginia, according to a survey by Redmon Group, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and Iteris. The findings suggest real-time traveler information impacts decision-making on when to depart the shopping... Read more »

The post Survey: Transit information displays help businesses, shoppers at Tysons Corner mall – Redmon Group appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
Sixty-three percent of respondents reported that information they viewed on the six transit-information displays influenced their decision of when to depart the Tysons Corner Center mall in Northern Virginia, according to a survey by Redmon Group, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and Iteris.

The findings suggest real-time traveler information impacts decision-making on when to depart the shopping center. Such content can influence travelers to remain on-site longer, providing more opportunities to visit retailers.

The report’s recommendation is to use the displays as a tool for influencing travelers at large employment, transit, and retail locations throughout Virginia.

Read the complete article at Redmon Group

The post Survey: Transit information displays help businesses, shoppers at Tysons Corner mall – Redmon Group appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/survey-transit-information-displays-help-businesses-shoppers-at-tysons-corner-mall/feed/ 0
Transit should be uncluttered onboard and in its advertising https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/transit-uncluttered-onboard-advertising/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/transit-uncluttered-onboard-advertising/#respond Fri, 14 Jul 2017 15:33:45 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23248 Mobility Lab recently published an article on how transit agencies nationwide should pool their resources to do an advertising campaign they can all use. Now, I think marketing is overrated in general, but it has its purpose, and transit could use any boost it can get. That being said, I disagree with Ethan Goffman’s Mobility... Read more »

The post Transit should be uncluttered onboard and in its advertising appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
Mobility Lab recently published an article on how transit agencies nationwide should pool their resources to do an advertising campaign they can all use.

Now, I think marketing is overrated in general, but it has its purpose, and transit could use any boost it can get. That being said, I disagree with Ethan Goffman’s Mobility Lab article on a few major points, and I have my own examples of good transit advertising to point to.

First, let’s start with what we can all agree on: most contemporary transit advertising in the U.S. sucks. A lot of it is very flat and bureaucratic, unimaginative, and oftentimes with a hokey gimmick. The examples Goffman offers are emblematic of this.

Most contemporary transit promotion that I’ve seen falls into three general categories: 1.) instructional videos, 2.) ads that emphasize the benefits over driving, which often incorporate imagery of stressed drivers and high gas prices, or 3.) ads that emphasize the societal benefits, such as environmental and health. Because it’s usually the transit agency itself that puts together the ad, the production values are frequently very low.

But it didn’t always used to be this way. A long time ago, advertising for transit tended to emphasize the destinations you could reach by transit, or the nature of the service itself. A particularly notable example of this was Samuel Insull’s series of posters for Chicago’s rail system in the 1920s, but there are plenty of other examples. When transit companies advertised, they often did so much like the railroad companies of the time did, with artful representations of the wonderful places you could visit and the exciting things you could do.

When automobiles became the dominant mode of transport for Americans, advertising for transit shifted its focus to emphasizing transit’s role as a potential alternative to driving. This is where we begin to see the selling points for transit familiar to us today: you avoid the stress of driving, you save money, you avoid wear and tear on your car. A good (and artful) early example of this is a pair of animated commercials run by Metropolitan Coach Lines in Los Angeles in the 1950s:

With mass transit becoming an increasingly public endeavor, subject to limited budgets and operating under an intensely bureaucratic framework, advertising for transit took on a defensive posture, often taking to justifying its existence or framing itself only in terms as an alternative to driving. Needless to say, this doesn’t tend to inspire very exciting marketing. Transit advertising has been in quite a rut for a while.

Which is why I was so excited the first time I watched this video:

If any transit agency in America is nailing its marketing, it’s Metro in Los Angeles. Besides having a very savvy social media presence (its blog, The Source, is probably the snazziest agency-run transit blog out there right now), Metro produces videos that are splendidly made. The videos they put out to promote the opening of the Expo Line extension to Santa Monica are particularly superb, not just for their catchy music and snappy editing, but also because they accomplish something that American transit agencies have been failing to do for quite some time: they make transit look glamorous. They make it look exciting. They emphasize where you can go—in short, they illustrate an opportunity now afforded to you. There’s a sense of possibility evoked by these videos.

The previous video focuses on the route and the trains themselves, highlighting the Expo Line itself. This one (which uses a lot of the same imagery) emphasizes the things you can do along the route, highlighting the personal experiences you can have:

Something I want to highlight with these ads is how straightforward the message is. Besides the “More to Explore” brand, there’s very little of the gimmicks we’re accustomed to seeing from transit advertising. There’s no flat narration (in fact, there’s no narration at all), there’s no “punny” slogan that makes you groan, no terrible video toaster transition effects, none of that. Simple, straightforward, focused.

There’s also a powerful subconscious effect to these videos. The aesthetic is very clean, efficient and fast – three things that every transit agency should want to be associated with.

And hey, it’s not just rail lines that get the snazzy Metro treatment. How about this one, promoting enhanced bus service to L.A.’s Griffith Observatory? Take note of how much information is conveyed (hours, frequency, and locations) without relying on narration while keeping everything focused and engaging (and in under a minute, no less).

Now, I will acknowledge that Metro has some advantages that most American transit agencies don’t enjoy. For one, Metro obviously puts a lot of money into its marketing department, such that they can apparently afford to get the rights to cool songs, rent drones that take excellent footage of passing trains, and hire editors who know how to do cool slow-motion effects. Metro also enjoys the geographic oddity of having an exceptionally large pool of entertainment and marketing talent right in its own city, and thus a lot of very experienced and talented people eager to take on exactly this kind of work. It’s unrealistic to expect every transit agency to be able to produce marketing of this high quality.

But when it comes to something like this, money is overrated. What transit advertising needs is vision. It requires focus. It should convey the possibilities afforded by your transit system. And all of this can be done without lots of money, so long as a clear vision is adhered to. Take the Griffith Observatory bus video; nothing very fancy there, just some nice shots of a roadway and people enjoying the observatory, with some text added later. But it’s still effective.

To bring this back to Goffman’s article, I think the examples of transit advertising that he points to as “good” are still quite awful. They’re lengthy and resort to lame gimmicks like covering a popular song (but with lyrics praising transit) or list “5 Fabulous Ways to Take Charge of Your Transportation.” It’s tacky and feels too-clever by half. And in this media-saturated day and age, people are very good at smelling a marketing gimmick. At one point, Goffman argues:

I would have liked to see a more complete message of the benefits of transit snuck into this video. It does go beyond the basic “nobody moves like transit” by stressing the difficulties of driving, being “caught in traffic, stuck in a car.” However, numerous other transit benefits could be touted: not having to pay for gas and repairs, not needing one car per family member, and being able to read or play games on your commute. It may be unrealistic to ask for a short ad to also tout the environmental benefits of transit, but other videos stressing this could be part of a series.

On the contrary, I believe transit advertising should adopt a “less is more” approach. The benefits of transit versus driving are something that transit advertising has already been focused on for decades. It’s not just unrealistic to ask for a short ad to tout all these benefits, it’s counterproductive. Try to tout everything and you’re inevitably going to wind up with something cluttered, which is something you don’t want associated with your transit system.

To this end, I actually don’t think a national advertising campaign for transit would be very beneficial. Consider the basic questions of who on the federal level would even fund such a campaign, who exactly would be making the money from this campaign, and will the ads even be good?

The kind of advertising I want to see transit adopt only works if it comes from the local level. Emphasizing the possibilities of your city’s transit agency isn’t something you can contract out to someone outside your city, it’s something that requires local knowledge.

Transit has been defending itself on someone else’s terms for long enough. It’s about time it learned how to sell itself.

This article is excerpted from its original publication at Bastard Urbanism.

Photo of woman looking at the LA Metro map by Steven Bevacqua/Flickr.

The post Transit should be uncluttered onboard and in its advertising appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/transit-uncluttered-onboard-advertising/feed/ 0
Study: DC among nation’s least driver-friendly cities – WTOP https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/study-dc-among-nation-s-least-driver-friendly-cities/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/study-dc-among-nation-s-least-driver-friendly-cities/#respond Fri, 14 Jul 2017 12:45:34 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23245 If any study ever made the case for more TDM in the nation’s capital, it’s this one. Not only did Washington D.C. rank high in traffic congestion and vehicle ownership costs, but the WalletHub study also showed that D.C. has relatively few repair shops available. Drivers are also 33 percent more likely to get into an accident,... Read more »

The post Study: DC among nation’s least driver-friendly cities – WTOP appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
If any study ever made the case for more TDM in the nation’s capital, it’s this one.

Not only did Washington D.C. rank high in traffic congestion and vehicle ownership costs, but the WalletHub study also showed that D.C. has relatively few repair shops available. Drivers are also 33 percent more likely to get into an accident, mostly because of excessive stop-and-go traffic, compared to the national average, researchers said.

Even worse cities are Detroit, Oakland, and San Francisco. Meanwhile, the so-called best cities for drivers include Corpus Christi, Texas; Gilbert, Ariz.; and Greensboro, N.C.

Read the complete article at wtop.com

The post Study: DC among nation’s least driver-friendly cities – WTOP appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/14/study-dc-among-nation-s-least-driver-friendly-cities/feed/ 0
Station placement is key to connecting bikeshare to the transportation grid https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/13/station-placement-key-connecting-bikeshare-transportation-grid/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/13/station-placement-key-connecting-bikeshare-transportation-grid/#respond Thu, 13 Jul 2017 18:23:55 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23219 A typical bikeshare member might often face an easy choice in trying to get from her home to downtown: pick up a bike and pedal with the wind in her hair, or sit in traffic and search in vain for a parking space. In the Washington D.C. region, with the spread of Capital Bikeshare stations,... Read more »

The post Station placement is key to connecting bikeshare to the transportation grid appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
A typical bikeshare member might often face an easy choice in trying to get from her home to downtown: pick up a bike and pedal with the wind in her hair, or sit in traffic and search in vain for a parking space.

In the Washington D.C. region, with the spread of Capital Bikeshare stations, more trips that might otherwise be driven can now be diverted to two wheels.

While the above scenario may be simplified and romanticized, Capital Bikeshare members say, as very clearly evidenced by their responses to the 2016 Capital Bikeshare survey, that they would use the system more often if it expanded even further (more docks, more bikes, and more stations).

Most notably, overall, more than half (55 percent) of members want there to be more docks and bikes at existing stations. This may suggest unmet demand for bike trips to be taken by members.

[Editor’s note: The above image is of new Capital Bikeshare stations in 2017, with different colors based on their jurisdictions.]

When gauging preferences across specific jurisdictions, members who live in the District say they would use Capital Bikeshare more frequently if there were more docks and bikes at existing stations (65 percent) and more stations in residential neighborhoods (43 percent).

By contrast, members outside of the District of Columbia want Capital Bikeshare to expand into areas where it currently does not operate and where bikeshare stations are not currently located near Metrorail. This further underlines how bikeshare provides potentially crucial access to Metrorail (the same could be said for access to bus routes too).

These answers are based off the question: “What Capital Bikeshare changes would encourage you to use the service more often? (Select up to three options).” Percentages may sum to more than 100 percent. The “n=” notation represents the total number of Capital Bikeshare members who responded to the survey for each jurisdiction.

Now a year after the survey was taken, Capital Bikeshare is moving aggressively to add more stations in both high-demand and edge areas. If you are familiar with the metro area, you’ll notice that the following list represents an expansion in bikeshare stations reflecting nicely on what members recommended in the 2016 Capital Bikeshare Study. The following is a rollout of the new bikeshare stations so far in 2017 (as also shown in the image at the top of the page):

Arlington County:

  • Washington-Lee High School/N Stafford St & Generals Way
  • Westover Library/Washington Blvd. & N. McKinley Rd
  • Columbia Pike & S. Taylor St.
  • Wilson Blvd & N. Troy St.

Washington, D.C.:

  • 15th & W St NW
  • 3rd & Underwood St NW
  • 18th & Monroe St NE
  • Georgia Ave. & Piney Branch Rd.
  • 31st & Water Street NW
  • 7th & E Street SW
  • Potomac & M St NW
  • Columbia & Ontario Rd. NW
  • Virginia Ave. & 25th St NW
  • 15th & M St NW
  • 2nd St & Seaton Pl NE
  • Connecticut Ave. & R ST NW
  • 11th & Girard St. NW
  • 15th & Constitution Ave. NW
  • Nebraska Ave/AU E. Campus

Montgomery County:

  • Pooks Hill Rd. & Linden Ave.
  • Takoma Park Rec Center
  • New Hampshire & Kirklynn Ave.
  • Wheaton Metro/Georgia Ave. & Reedie Drive
  • Amherst Avenue & Elkins Street
  • Amherst Avenue & Prichard Rd.
  • Grandview & Blueridge Avenue
  • Windham Ln & Amherst Avenue
  • Shady Grove Metro East
  • Columbus Avenue & Tribeca Street
  • Columbia Avenue & Gramercy Blvd.
  • Key West Avenue & Great Seneca Hwy

Fairfax County:

  • Tysons One Pl & Chain Bridge Rd
  • North Shore & Cameron Crescent Dr/Crescent Apartments
  • Sunset Hills Rd & Discovery Square
  • North Shore Dr. & Village Rd.
  • Sunset Hills Rd. & Isaac Newton Square
  • Town Center Pkwy & Sunset Hills Rd.
  • Reston Pkwy & Spectrum Dr.

Along with the survey, Capital Bikeshare relies partially on crowdsourced suggestions to provide insight into selecting new station locations at its CabiStations.com customer-service website. According to this website, a few of the more desirable locations for future bikeshare stations in Washington, D.C., include:

  • New York Avenue, NW & 17th NW (Near the Corcoran School of The Arts & Design)
  • 1st Street & F Street NW- (Near Georgetown University Law Center)
  • Union Station Drive NE & First Street NE (Near Union Station and its Metro station)
  • 17th Street NE & Gales Street NE (Near Rosedale Neighborhood Library)

To read more about best practices for bikeshare-station placement, the National Association of City Transportation Officials has created a Bike Share Station Sharing Guide.

“Getting bikeshare-station placement right propels success,” said Seleta Reynolds, general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation and NACTO president, in a press release last year.

Featured map of new Capital Bikeshare stations by Adam Russell of Mobility Lab.

The post Station placement is key to connecting bikeshare to the transportation grid appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/13/station-placement-key-connecting-bikeshare-transportation-grid/feed/ 0
Equal Rights Center sues Uber for denying equal access to people who use wheelchairs – TechCrunch https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/10/equal-rights-center-sues-uber-for-denying-equal-access-to-people-who-use-wheelchairs/ https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/10/equal-rights-center-sues-uber-for-denying-equal-access-to-people-who-use-wheelchairs/#respond Mon, 10 Jul 2017 21:45:25 +0000 https://mobilitylab.org/?p=23209 The Equal Rights Center is suing Uber for denying equal access to its services for people with disabilities. According to the lawsuit, the ERC alleges that Uber has chosen not to include wheelchair-accessible cars as an option in its standard UberX fleet of vehicles, and excludes people who use wheelchairs in Washington, D.C. After conducting... Read more »

The post Equal Rights Center sues Uber for denying equal access to people who use wheelchairs – TechCrunch appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
The Equal Rights Center is suing Uber for denying equal access to its services for people with disabilities. According to the lawsuit, the ERC alleges that Uber has chosen not to include wheelchair-accessible cars as an option in its standard UberX fleet of vehicles, and excludes people who use wheelchairs in Washington, D.C. After conducting its own investigation of Uber’s services for people in wheelchairs, the ERC found that passengers had to wait an average of eight times longer for an accessible car to arrive and had to pay twice as much in fares.

Read the complete article at TechCrunch

The post Equal Rights Center sues Uber for denying equal access to people who use wheelchairs – TechCrunch appeared first on Mobility Lab.

]]>
https://mobilitylab.org/2017/07/10/equal-rights-center-sues-uber-for-denying-equal-access-to-people-who-use-wheelchairs/feed/ 0