Authors & Contributions
Monique Wahba

Monique Wahba

Monique is a proponent of transportation equity, stemming from her work in transportation planning in Portland, Oregon and in neighborhood revitalization in Albany, New York.

Free transit attracts riders and helps communities in more ways than one

In January, Missoula, Montana’s transit agency, Mountain Line, began a three-year, “zero-fare” demonstration project on its fixed-route and door-to-door services, meaning boarding passengers no longer pay to use the bus. Implementing a zero-fare system was part of a larger transit improvement package that includes late-night service on its four most popular routes, increased frequency on… Read more »

Does Chicago’s Elevated “L” Get the Fundamentals of Transit Right?

I was passing through Chicago en route to Missouri to attend my niece’s high-school graduation. As I had a layover of several hours between my flight’s arrival in Chicago and my Amtrak train to Missouri, I thought I would take the “L” downtown to visit The Art Institute of Chicago, then walk over to the… Read more »

London and Stockholm Boldly Reimagine Bicycle Commuting

I recently compared two approaches to accommodating bicyclists and pedestrians in cities: separation (through protected bike lanes) and integration (through the modern woonerf). How are some of these approaches working in London, England and Stockholm, Sweden? London’s Possibilities I came across three different schemes either being considered or built to accommodate the growing number of… Read more »

Seemingly Little Things Make D.C. Transit Too Difficult

I recently flew down to Washington D.C. to attend a friend’s wedding in Rockville, Maryland. With trains, planes, and automobiles involved, surely, I thought, there would be something to write about. My flights were thankfully uneventful. With nothing more than a carry-on, electronic check-in at Albany International Airport was a breeze. The machines were easy… Read more »

We Need to Ask More Questions About How We Move Through Places

There appears to be two lines of thinking about bicyclists and pedestrians in the modal mix. On the one hand, there is a growing movement for separated bicycle facilities – not just bike lanes but ones with a physical barrier offering true separation from automobile traffic. On the other hand, there is the idea of… Read more »

5 Ways Our Transportation Vocabulary Makes Absolutely No Sense

Planners (myself included) love to bemoan our society’s over-reliance on the automobile. We attribute it to misguided-land use policies that promote sprawl, and funding biases that direct more money toward paving roads than expanding transit service. We even acknowledge that we are up against a “car culture” or “America’s love affair with the automobile” which… Read more »