Items Tagged with

Ride-Hailing

GMU “blueprint” study suggests avenues for expanding reach of Arlington’s transportation options

This is part one of a two-part series on a report by George Mason University graduate students. Students were tasked by Mobility Lab with creating a new transportation blueprint for Arlington, Va., geared toward connecting more people to its transportation network. This part focuses on passenger transportation – part two will examine freight and deliveries…. Read more »

Will growth of shared mobility make people more willing to share their own cars?

As many as 95 percent of trips in big cities could be shared with no more than a 5-minute inconvenience for riders, according to a recent report co-authored by Carlo Ratti of MIT’s SENSEable City Lab. Back in 2010, the Albany Times Union did some interesting reporting to delve into why New York State residents… Read more »

Will people ever share rides in small and mid-size cities?

Cities and providers face challenge of promoting shared options against the ease of drive-alone trips This week our communications director Paul Mackie is reporting from South by Southwest in Austin, Texas. Why would there be much urgency in creating shared-mobility options in a place like Austin? RideAustin, Fasten, and others easily slipped in to take the… Read more »

Breaking the mold in the quest for the ultimate connected city

This is part 2 of a two-part series on how advocates can create connected cities. Part 1 examined public agencies reshaping their transportation priorities. Pinellas County, Fla., just west of Tampa Bay, is one of several local governments in the nation to essentially embed Uber and Lyft into the local transit system. Transit riders can… Read more »

Untangling the jumbled path towards the ultimate connected city

This is part 1 of a two-part series on how advocates can create connected cities, examining how public agencies can reshape their priorities. Part 2 will detail how they can then move beyond conventional projects. Smartphone owners feel connected much of the time, for better or worse. But shouldn’t that be the goal for physical… Read more »

New services are moving fast, and cities are looking to update procurement processes to keep up

Notoriously lumbering municipal procurement processes can be an especially bad fit with the way newer transportation options need to be implemented. How are local agencies supposed to form “first-mile, last-mile” partnerships with flexible technology services like Lyft, Via, and Bridj when the official steps to solidify those partnerships impede the process? “A transit agency can… Read more »

Overcoming obstacles in on-demand public-private agreements

The recent rise of “mobility on demand” services like Uber and Zipcar has shifted society’s understanding of transportation systems and how they operate. “Mobility has evolved in the past 10 to 15 years from a binary choice,” Justin Holmes of Zipcar explained at this month’s TransportationCamp DC. “An accordion of choice has opened for consumers.”… Read more »

Transportation connectivity as a tool for public health in rural communities

This Saturday’s TransportationCamp DC 2017 will feature a broad array of topics. Esther Dyson, executive founder of Way to Wellville, author, and angel investor, will appear in a session about creating more connected cities. Access is an important factor in community health, and a well-connected transportation network plays a vital role in enabling that. Small,… Read more »

Bringing transportation options to small and mid-sized cities

Quality transit, abundant ride-hailing apps, and quick-trip bikeshare systems are largely assumed to be the province of big cities, but small and mid-sized cities are getting in on the game too. That was the takeaway at a workshop during this week’s Shared Mobility Summit in Chicago titled, “Scaling Shared Mobility in Small to Mid-sized Cities.”… Read more »

How does actual sharing fit into the sharing economy?

It’s safe to say that, in 2016, the sharing economy has gone mainstream. What’s funny about this is that what most people are referring to when we talk about this segment of the economy has little to do with sharing. I was thinking about this while I rode my hotel’s “shared bicycle” ($22 for four hours)… Read more »