Items Tagged with

Ride-Hailing

Speedy adoption of autonomous vehicles could be disastrous

The smart-growth and transit revolution of the last decade or two has had only partial success. Despite some revitalized cities and some new transit, sprawl remains dominant in America. On the heels of this incomplete revolution comes a new one: automated vehicles (AVs) that are certain to alter land use and transit. As the predominance… Read more »

photo credit: innovativemobility.com

How ride-hailing is disrupting transit, the auto industry, and our communities

This is a two-part series on ride-hailing carpool-like services. Part 1 introduced us to Via, now operating in Washington D.C., and included the results of a test ride with the service. Via launched in 2012 in Manhattan and now also operates in Chicago and Washington, D.C. And it’s similar to other services such as San Francisco’s… Read more »

Can multi-passenger ride-hailing complement public transit?

This is Part 1 of a two-part series on Via, a ride-hailing carpool-like service that has recently launched in Washington D.C. (Part 2 is here.) Buses cheaply transport masses of people but are slow and inconvenient. They make numerous stops, yet are still difficult for some to access. Uber and Lyft solve these problems, but… Read more »

NEVs Sprynt

Upscale golf cart becomes the latest mobility innovation in Arlington

This summer, Sprynt moved Arlington, Va., into a new category: a community with a street-legal electric golf-cart shuttle. I missed Sprynt’s opening day on June 23, but my kids caught me up on the way to swim practice one morning a few weeks later. They said “Sprynt looks like a stretch-golf-cart. You’ll probably like it,… Read more »

GMU “blueprint” study suggests avenues for expanding reach of Arlington’s transportation options

This is part one of a two-part series on a report by George Mason University graduate students. Students were tasked by Mobility Lab with creating a new transportation blueprint for Arlington, Va., geared toward connecting more people to its transportation network. This part focuses on passenger transportation – part two will examine freight and deliveries…. Read more »

Will growth of shared mobility make people more willing to share their own cars?

As many as 95 percent of trips in big cities could be shared with no more than a 5-minute inconvenience for riders, according to a recent report co-authored by Carlo Ratti of MIT’s SENSEable City Lab. Back in 2010, the Albany Times Union did some interesting reporting to delve into why New York State residents… Read more »

Will people ever share rides in small and mid-size cities?

Cities and providers face challenge of promoting shared options against the ease of drive-alone trips This week our communications director Paul Mackie is reporting from South by Southwest in Austin, Texas. Why would there be much urgency in creating shared-mobility options in a place like Austin? RideAustin, Fasten, and others easily slipped in to take the… Read more »

Breaking the mold in the quest for the ultimate connected city

This is part 2 of a two-part series on how advocates can create connected cities. Part 1 examined public agencies reshaping their transportation priorities. Pinellas County, Fla., just west of Tampa Bay, is one of several local governments in the nation to essentially embed Uber and Lyft into the local transit system. Transit riders can… Read more »

Untangling the jumbled path towards the ultimate connected city

This is part 1 of a two-part series on how advocates can create connected cities, examining how public agencies can reshape their priorities. Part 2 will detail how they can then move beyond conventional projects. Smartphone owners feel connected much of the time, for better or worse. But shouldn’t that be the goal for physical… Read more »

New services are moving fast, and cities are looking to update procurement processes to keep up

Notoriously lumbering municipal procurement processes can be an especially bad fit with the way newer transportation options need to be implemented. How are local agencies supposed to form “first-mile, last-mile” partnerships with flexible technology services like Lyft, Via, and Bridj when the official steps to solidify those partnerships impede the process? “A transit agency can… Read more »