Items Tagged with

San Francisco

California merchants, public clamor for rethinking our transportation impulses

In bustling city cores, people driving alone in their personal cars can be the worst thing for local merchants. Many of them simply didn’t know it before, but they’re slowly beginning to figure it out. Three new stories out of California show that the state is taking the concept of transportation demand seriously. Take this example:… Read more »

12 ways developers can guide tenants to better transportation decisions

Real-estate developers and property managers have long been coming around to the simple business decision that, if they want to manage profitable projects and attract tenants, they should build and own near transit and other non-driving options. Just look at Detroit: A 2.5-mile streetcar system expected to launch in a few months to downtown is… Read more »

Biking’s role in San Francisco’s transportation network

Editor’s note: Mobility Lab’s technology reporter Andrew Carpenter is spending the summer biking across the continental United States, reporting back on transportation issues he encounters along the way. His series, “Transpo(nation): A cross-country tour of how we get around,” begins in San Francisco. My first full day in San Francisco, May 12, also happened to… Read more »

Five big lessons to help small cities expand shared mobility

Discussions on shared mobility often focus on transportation solutions for high-density city neighborhoods. But most of the recent growth in the U.S. – and by far the greatest share of urbanized land – is now in suburban areas outside the urban core, as well as in smaller, lower-density cities. This issue was addressed recently at… Read more »

Metro Helping Blind People Better Navigate D.C. Transit

Transit agencies have an opportunity to follow the cutting-edge initiatives for the blind that have already been introduced in places like retail outlets Macy’s and American Eagle, and most Major League Baseball ballparks. With a grant from ClickandGo Wayfinding, Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind and the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) are harnessing the… Read more »

Free transit attracts riders and helps communities in more ways than one

In January, Missoula, Montana’s transit agency, Mountain Line, began a three-year, “zero-fare” demonstration project on its fixed-route and door-to-door services, meaning boarding passengers no longer pay to use the bus. Implementing a zero-fare system was part of a larger transit improvement package that includes late-night service on its four most popular routes, increased frequency on… Read more »

Planning Tool Brings Hope for Transit Users

Paul Supawanich and his colleagues want to make transit better. They see transit as a powerful force for good because it is efficient at moving lots of people. The problem, as many transit riders will tell you, is sometimes transit isn’t actually that efficient in terms of getting someone from one place to another. There… Read more »

Streets and Sidewalks Should Be Used to Improve Our Health

Streets and sidewalks take up 25 to 50 percent of a typical U.S. city’s land. New York City, for example, is on the lower end of that scale at 28 percent and Chicago (42 percent), Washington D.C. (43) and Portland, Oregon (47) are at the higher end. This, believe it or not, presents a huge… Read more »

Living in the Heart of D.C. May Actually Be Cheaper Than Living in the Outer Suburbs

The conventional wisdom is that living in the city is much more expensive than living outside of it. Taxes, entertainment, and groceries all add up to a slightly higher cost of living in the city. Housing, though, is the expense that tips the scales decidedly in favor of the suburbs. Or does it? With car… Read more »

Gridlock Is Not Just for D.C. Politics

File this one under “lists you don’t want to appear on.” Consumer finance website NerdWallet has released a list of the top 10 Worst Cities for Car Drivers. Washington D.C., number two on the list, proves once again that the term “gridlock” doesn’t just apply to the city’s politics. NerdWallet gave Washington poor scores because,… Read more »